Healthy eating slows down mental decline

Good news for your brain and body today! A new study shows that healthy eating slows down cognitive decline.

An article about the study was published in this week’s Irish Medical Times, we’ve copied it below for you to read, and we’ve peppered the article with some videos showing quick, easy and healthy recipe demonstrations.

Happy eating!

 

A comprehensive programme providing older people at risk of dementia with healthy eating guidance, exercise, brain training, and management of metabolic and vascular risk factors appears to slow down cognitive decline, according to the first ever randomised controlled trial of its kind, published in The Lancet.


In the Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER) study, researchers led by Prof Miia Kivipelto from the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden, National Institute for Health and Welfare in Helsinki, and University of Eastern Finland, assessed the effects on brain function of a comprehensive intervention aimed at addressing some of the most important risk factors for age-related dementia, such as high body-mass index and heart health.

A total of 1,260 people from across Finland, aged 60–77 years, were included in the study, with half randomly allocated to the intervention group, and half allocated to a control group, who received regular health advice only.

All of the study participants were deemed to be at risk of dementia, based on standardised test scores.

 

The intensive intervention consisted of regular meetings over two years with physicians, nurses, and other health professionals, with participants given comprehensive advice on maintaining a healthy diet, exercise programmes including both muscle and cardiovascular training, brain training exercises, and management of metabolic and vascular risk factors through regular blood tests, and other means.

After two years, study participants’ mental function was scored using a standard test, the Neuropsychological Test Battery (NTB), where a higher score corresponds to better mental functioning.

 

 

Overall test scores in the intervention group were 25 per cent higher than in the control group.

For some parts of the test, the difference between groups was even more striking — for executive functioning (the brain’s ability to organise and regulate thought processes) scores were 83 per cent higher in the intervention group, and processing speed was 150 per cent higher.

 

Based on a pre-specified analysis, the intervention appeared to have no effect on patients’ memory. However, based on post-hoc analyses, there was a difference in memory scores between the intervention and control groups.

According to Prof Kivipelto, much previous research has shown that there are links between cognitive decline in older people and factors such as diet, heart health, and fitness. “However, our study is the first large randomised controlled trial to show that an intensive programme aimed at addressing these risk factors might be able to prevent cognitive decline in elderly people who are at risk of dementia.”

Lancet, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(15)60461-5.

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How mighty is the oat?! Scientists find more than grain of truth in benefits of porridge

Remember being told about the virtues of porridge when you were a sceptical child? Well those stories appear to be even more true than your parents and teachers may have predicted. New research is finding that the mighty oat could actually lower cholesterol and clean the arteries while delivering other powerful heart-protective qualities.

The article below is by LAURA DONNELLY for the Irish Independent.

Fans of porridge have long claimed that it gives them the best start to the day – but scientists say there is evidence that it could also have a special ingredient that actively cleans the arteries, protecting against cancer and heart disease.

A meeting of researchers says there is growing evidence that a bioactive compound contained only in oats may possess protective antioxidant properties.

Oats are the breakfast of choice for many athletes and dieters, who find the high fibre levels give them energy for longer. The combination of fibre, vitamins and minerals in whole grains has also been linked to a reduced risk of diseases.

One particular fibre found only in oats – called beta-glucan – has already been credited with lowering cholesterol.

But scientists at the annual conference of the American Chemical Society in Dallas, Texas, yesterday said there was growing evidence that the benefits of oats do not just come from the fibre.

Researchers said studies suggested that a bioactive compound called avenanthramide could stop fat forming in the arteries, causing heart attacks and strokes.

Dr Shengmin Sang, from the North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, said: “While the data to support the importance of oat beta-glucan remains, these studies reveal that the heart health benefit of eating oats may go beyond fibre. As the scientific investigators dig deeper, we have discovered that the bioactive compounds found in oats may provide additional cardio-protective benefits.”

CRUCIAL

Fat formation in the arteries can become a condition called atherosclerosis in which the arteries become clogged. This can lead to organ damage or blood clots that result in heart attacks or strokes.

Previous studies have suggested that the fibre contained in porridge can reduce cholesterol levels by as much as 23pc.

Studies on children have suggested the traditional breakfast dish can help to keep obesity at bay. Youngsters who eat oats regularly are 50pc less likely to be overweight, one study of 10,000 children found.

Oats can reduce high blood pressure, which is closely linked to stroke and heart disease. They are also a source of vitamin B1 (thiamin) which is crucial for the nervous system, and folic acid, which is essential for healthy foetal development.

In an attempt to increase folic acid levels, pregnancy advisers have joined doctors in urging the British government to fortify flour with the acid to cut the number of babies developing defects such as spina bifida.

The British Pregnancy Advisory Service has also said it is time recommendations to fortify flour with the vitamin were implemented in the UK.

Irish Independent

For a pre-Christmas health-kick…!

vitagreen image 1

 

Here at Dunphy Medical we’re stocking up on Chlorella, Vitamin C and Omega Oils with added Vitamin D to stay healthy amid winter’s bugs and flus.

Vitamin B is a perennial favourite and Toki is keeping our skin supple and youthful despite any harsh winter winds.

To discover our range of health products click on the Products tab at the top of this website’s homepage or just follow this link https://dunphymedicalcarrigaline.com/products/. All health supplements can be purchased online via PayPal or directly with a cheque or postal order. Purchases will then be delivered to your door by return mail, there’s no need to even leave the house!

 

IPCC: rapid carbon emission cuts vital to stop severe impact of climate change

The IPCC report on climate change states that rapid cuts to carbon emissions are vital, economically affordable and technically possible.

Below is an article by Damian Carrington for The Guardian about the report or follow this link to the Guardian’s site

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/nov/02/rapid-carbon-emission-cuts-severe-impact-climate-change-ipcc-report.

 

Mehrum power plant

Carbon emissions, such as those from the Mehrum coal-fired power plant in Germany, will have to fall to zero to avoid catastrophic climate change, the IPCC says. Photograph: Julian Stratenschulte/Corbis

Most important assessment of global warming yet warns carbon emissions must be cut sharply and soon, but UN’s IPCC says solutions are available and affordable

Climate change is set to inflict “severe, widespread, and irreversible impacts” on people and the natural world unless carbon emissions are cut sharply and rapidly, according to the most important assessment of global warming yet published.

The stark report states that climate change has already increased the risk of severe heatwaves and other extreme weather and warns of worse to come, including food shortages and violent conflicts. But it also found that ways to avoid dangerous global warming are both available and affordable.

“Science has spoken. There is no ambiguity in the message,” said the UN secretary general, Ban Ki-moon, attending what he described as the “historic” report launch. “Leaders must act. Time is not on our side.” He said that quick, decisive action would build a better and sustainable future, while inaction would be costly.

Ban added a message to investors, such as pension fund managers: “Please reduce your investments in the coal- and fossil fuel-based economy and [move] to renewable energy.”

The report, released in Copenhagen on Sunday by the UN’sIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), is the work of thousands of scientists and was agreed after negotiations by the world’s governments. It is the first IPCC report since 2007 to bring together all aspects of tackling climate change and for the first time states: that it is economically affordable; that carbon emissions will ultimately have to fall to zero; and that global poverty can only be reduced by halting global warming. The report also makes clear that carbon emissions, mainly from burning coal, oil and gas, are currently rising to record levels, not falling.

The report comes at a critical time for international action on climate change, with the deadline for a global deal just over a year away. In September, 120 national leaders met at the UN in New York to address climate change, while hundreds of thousands of marchers around the world demanded action.

 

Sea-level-change graph

 

“We have the means to limit climate change,” said Rajendra Pachauri, chair of the IPCC. “The solutions are many and allow for continued economic and human development. All we need is the will to change.”

Lord Nicholas Stern, a professor at the London School of Economics and the author of an influential earlier study, said the new IPCC report was the “most important assessment of climate change ever prepared” and that it made plain that “further delays in tackling climate change would be dangerous and profoundly irrational”.

“The reality of climate change is undeniable, and cannot be simply wished away by politicians who lack the courage to confront the scientific evidence,” he said, adding that the lives and livelihoods of hundreds of millions of people were at risk.

Ed Davey, the UK energy and climate change secretary, said: “This is the most comprehensive and robust assessment ever produced. It sends a clear message: we must act on climate change now. John Kerry, the US secretary of state, said: “This is another canary in the coal mine. We can’t prevent a large scale disaster if we don’t heed this kind of hard science.”

Bill McKibben, a high-profile climate campaigner with 350.org, said: “For scientists, conservative by nature, to use ‘serious, pervasive, and irreversible’ to describe the effects of climate falls just short of announcing that climate change will produce a zombie apocalypse plus random beheadings plus Ebola.” Breaking the power of the fossil fuel industry would not be easy, McKibben said. “But, thanks to the IPCC, no one will ever be able to say they weren’t warned.”

singapore polution

 Singapore shrouded by a haze as carbon emissions soar. Photograph: Roslan Rahman AFP/Getty Images

The new overarching IPCC report builds on previous reports on thescience, impacts and solutions for climate change. It concludes that global warming is “unequivocal”, that humanity’s role in causing it is “clear” and that many effects will last for hundreds to thousands of years even if the planet’s rising temperature is halted.

In terms of impacts, such as heatwaves and extreme rain storms causing floods, the report concludes that the effects are already being felt: “In recent decades, changes in climate have caused impacts on natural and human systems on all continents and across the oceans.”

Droughts, coastal storm surges from the rising oceans and wildlife extinctions on land and in the seas will all worsen unless emissions are cut, the report states. This will have knock-on effects, according to the IPCC: “Climate change is projected to undermine food security.” The report also found the risk of wars could increase: “Climate change can indirectly increase risks of violent conflicts by amplifying well-documented drivers of these conflicts such as poverty and economic shocks.”

Two-thirds of all the emissions permissible if dangerous climate change is to be avoided have already been pumped into the atmosphere, the IPPC found. The lowest cost route to stopping dangerous warming would be for emissions to peak by 2020 – an extremely challenging goal – and then fall to zero later this century.

The report calculates that to prevent dangerous climate change,investment in low-carbon electricity and energy efficiency will have to rise by several hundred billion dollars a year before 2030. But it also found that delaying significant emission cuts to 2030 puts up the cost of reducing carbon dioxide by almost 50%, partly because dirty power stations would have to be closed early. “If you wait, you also have to do more difficult and expensive things,” said Jim Skea, a professor at Imperial College London and an IPCC working group vice-chair.

The coal-fired Scherer plant in operation in Juliette, Georgia.
The coal-fired Scherer plant in operation in Juliette, Georgia. Photograph: John Amis/AP

Tackling climate change need only trim economic growth rates by a tiny fraction, the IPCC states, and may actually improve growth by providing other benefits, such as cutting health-damaging air pollution.

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) – the nascent technology which aims to bury CO2 underground – is deemed extremely important by the IPPC. It estimates that the cost of the big emissions cuts required would more than double without CCS. Pachauri said: “With CCS it is entirely possible for fossil fuels to continue to be used on a large scale.”

The focus on CCS is not because the technology has advanced a great deal in recent years, said Jean-Pascal van Ypersele, a professor at the Université Catholique de Louvain in Belgium and vice-chair of the IPCC, but because emissions have continued to increase so quickly. “We have emitted so much more, so we have to clean up more later”, he said.

Linking CCS to the burning of wood and other plant fuels would reduce atmospheric CO2 levels because the carbon they contain is sucked from the air as they grow. But van Ypersele said the IPCC report also states “very honestly and fairly” that there are risks to this approach, such as conflicts with food security.

In contrast to the importance the IPCC gives to CCS, abandoning nuclear power or deploying only limited wind or solar power increases the cost of emission cuts by just 6-7%. The report also states that behavioural changes, such as dietary changes that could involve eating less meat, can have a role in cutting emissions.

As part of setting out how the world’s nations can cut emissions effectively, the IPCC report gives prominence to ethical considerations. “[Carbon emission cuts] and adaptation raise issues of equity, justice, and fairness,” says the report. “The evidence suggests that outcomes seen as equitable can lead to more effective [international] cooperation.”

These issues are central to the global climate change negotiations and their inclusion in the report was welcomed by campaigners, as was the statement that adapting countries and coastlines to cope with global warming cannot by itself avert serious impacts.

“Rich governments must stop making empty promises and come up with the cash so the poorest do not have to foot the bill for the lifestyles of the wealthy,” said Harjeet Singh, from ActionAid.

The statement that carbon emissions must fall to zero was “gamechanging”, according to Kaisa Kosonen, from Greenpeace. “We can still limit warming to 2C, or even 1.5C or less even, [but] we need to phase out emissions,” she said. Unlike CCS, which is yet to be proven commercially, she said renewable energy was falling rapidly in cost.

Sam Smith, from WWF, said: “The big change in this report is that it shows fighting climate change is not going to cripple economies and that it is essential to bringing people out of poverty. What is needed now is concerted political action.” The rapid response of politicians to the recent global financial crisis showed, according to Smith, that “they could act quickly and at scale if they are sufficiently motivated”.

Michel Jarraud, secretary general of the World Meteorological Organisation, said the much greater certainty expressed in the new IPCC report would give international climate talks a better chance than those which failed in 2009. “Ignorance can no longer be an excuse for no action,” he said.

Observers played down the moves made by some countries with large fossil fuel reserves to weaken the language of the draft IPCC report written by scientists and seen by the Guardian, saying the final report was conservative but strong.

However, the statement that “climate change is expected to lead to increases in ill-health in many regions, including greater likelihood of death” was deleted in the final report, along with criticism that politicians sometimes “engage in short-term thinking and are biased toward the status quo”.

 

 

You say potato….

 

Hello everyone, here’s yet more justification for eating most Irish people’s favourite food, the fabulous potato. Below is a video by Dr. John McDougall about the health benefits of starch-based diets, we hope you find it interesting.

 

 

And if you’re looking for inspiring ways to cook our noble spud, check out Elgy Gilespie’s cookbook ‘You Say Potato!’

Bon Appetit!

 

Potato

 

 

 

Have you watched these videos yet?

 

 

 

Why did Steve Jobs Die? – Dr. John McDougall

 

 

 

 

 

Loving Your Lady Parts – Alisa Vitti

 

 

 

 

 

23 and 1/2 hours: What is the single best thing we can do for our health?

 

 

 

 

 

What’s wrong with what we eat? – Mark Bittman

 

 

 

 

 

Natural Cure for Depression, Bipolar, ADHD, Schizophrenia – Dr. Abram Hoffer

Happy Mother’s Day!

mOTHERS DAYimages

 

 

In celebration of Mothers Day this Sunday 30th March, we are celebrating all things feminine with a video from the inspirational TedTalks, and some information on the benefits of Vitamin B for women of all ages.

 

 

 TEDxFiDiWomen – Alisa Vitti – Loving Your Lady Parts as a Path to Success, Power & Global Change

 


 

 

 

Vitamin B

Many people take a vitamin B complex to increase energy, enhance mood, improve memory and focus, and stimulate the immune system, however B vitamins may be particularly important for women for a number of reasons. B vitamins can help alleviate PMS symptoms, and women taking the contraceptive pill may particularly want to watch their B vitamin intake as there is an established link between contraceptive pill use and depleted vitamin B6.

A vitamin B complex is a dietary supplement that contains all eight of the B vitamins: B1 (thiamine), B2 (riboflavin), B3 (niacin), B5 (pantothenic acid), B6, B7 (biotin), B9 (folate), B12. Also found naturally in a number foods, B vitamins help the body to produce energy and form red blood cells.

 

 

Health Benefits of B Vitamins

Each B vitamin is essential for specific bodily functions:

  •          B1 and B2 are important for healthy functioning of the muscles, nerves, and heart
  •          B3 helps regulate the nervous and digestive systems
  •          B5 and B12 are required for normal growth and development
  •          B6 supports the immune system and aids the body in breaking down protein
  •          B7 is involved in the production of hormones
  •          B9 helps cells make and maintain DNA

Studies show that taking supplements containing certain B vitamins may benefit your health. For instance:

  •          B1 may help prevent kidney disease in people with type 2 diabetes and reduce risk of cataracts
  •          B2 may prevent migraines; B3 may lower cholesterol levels
  •          B6 may protect against heart disease, relieve PMS symptoms, and alleviate pregnancy-related nausea
  •          B9 may help prevent breast cancer, colorectal cancer, and pancreatic cancer. B9 (folate) can also decrease the  risk of birth defects when taken by pregnant women
  •          B12 may lower cervical cancer risk and reduce levels of homocysteine (an amino acid thought to contribute to heart disease when it occurs at elevated levels)

 

Why Do People Take B Complex Supplements?

Proponents claim that vitamin B complex supplements can help with a variety of health conditions, including:

  •       Anxiety   
  •      Depression    
  •      Fatigue   
  •      Heart Disease    
  •      Premenstrual Syndrome    
  •      Skin Problems     

 

 

Food Sources of B Vitamins

 

  •          cereals and whole grains (a source of B1, B2, and B3)
  •          green leafy vegetables (a source of B2 and B9)
  •          eggs (a source of B7 and B12)
  •          chicken (a source of B3, B6, and B12)
  •          citrus fruits (a source of B9)
  •          nuts (a source of B3 and B9)
  •          kidney beans (a source of B1 and B2)
  •          bananas (a source of B6 and B7)

Vitamin B5 is found in almost all foods.

 

When Should You Take a B Complex Supplement?

If you’re not getting enough B vitamins from your diet, taking a B complex supplement may be beneficial. Deficiency in B vitamins can cause a number of symptoms, including tiredness, anemia, loss of appetite, depression, abdominal pain, muscle cramps, hair loss, and eczema.

 

Consult your health care provider to find out whether a B complex supplement is right for you.

 

The B Complex we currently stock is Douglas Lab’s Tri-B-100.

 

tri b

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Tri-B-100

Energy and stress control

DESCRIPTION

Tri-B-100 provided by Douglas Laboratories® is a six

to eight hour timed release formulation of all the B

vitamins as well as several other important dietary

components metabolically associated with the B

 

FUNCTIONS

As coenzymes, the B vitamins are essential

components in most major metabolic reactions. As

water-soluble substances, B vitamins are not

generally stored in the body in any appreciable

amounts (with the exception of vitamin B-12).

Therefore, the body needs an adequate supply of B

vitamins on a daily basis.

Vitamin B-1 (thiamin), vitamin B-2 (riboflavin), and

niacinamide are all essential coenzymes in energy

production. Thiamin is required for the energetics of

the glycolytic and Citric Acid Cycle reactions.

Thiamin is also related to nerve impulse

transmission. Riboflavin is a component of

coenzymes FAD and FMN, which are intermediates

in many redox reactions, including energy production

and cellular respiration reactions. Niacin is a

component of the coenzymes NAD and NADP,

which are also integral components of energy

production reactions.

Vitamin B-6 dependent enzymes are required for the

biosynthesis of many neurotransmitters, including

serotonin, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. Vitamin

B-6, a coenzyme in amino acid metabolism, is also

necessary for the processing of homocysteine and the

conversion of tryptophan into niacin.

Folic acid together with vitamin B-12 serves as a

methyl donor for biosynthetic reactions, including the

conversion of homocysteine to methionine.

Optimum metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, and

fats depends upon adequate levels of biotin and

pantothenic acid. Biotin is essential for many

metabolic carboxylation reactions, while pantothenic

acid, as part of Coenzyme A, is essential to energy

production via the Citric Acid Cycle.

While not truly vitamins, choline, inositol, and paraaminobenzoic

acid are important, related nutrients to

B vitamins. Choline serves not only as a methyl

donor for homocysteine metabolism following

conversion to betaine, but also as a structural

component of cellular membranes as

phosphatidylcholine and of the neurotransmitter

acetylcholine. Inositol aids in the cellular response to

hormonal signals, serves as a source of arachidonic

acid, and is active in cellular membranes as

phoshatidylinositol. Finally, para-aminobenzoic acid

is an integral component of folic acid as well as

having antioxidant properties.

 

INDICATIONS

Tri-B-100 tablets may be a useful dietary supplement

for those individuals who wish to increase their

intake of the B vitamins to help maintain the higher

energy levels needed for stress control.

 

FORMULA (#7913)

Each Timed Release B-Complex Tablet Contains:

Vitamin B-1 ………………………………………….100 mg

Vitamin B-2 ………………………………………….100 mg

Vitamin B-6 ………………………………………….100 mg

Vitamin B-12 ………………………………………..100 mcg

Niacinamide………………………………………….100 mg

Folic Acid …………………………………………….400 mcg

Pantothenic Acid …………………………………..100 mg

d-Biotin………………………………………………..100 mcg

Choline Bitartrate ………………………………….100 mg

Inositol…………………………………………………100 mg

PABA ………………………………………………….100 mg

(Para-Aminobenzoic Acid)

In a base designed to provide prolonged

release over a 6 to 8 hour period.

Douglas Product Data

Laboratories®

SUGGESTED USE

Adults take 1 tablet daily or as directed by physician.

 

SIDE EFFECTS

No adverse effects have been reported.

 

STORAGE

Store in a cool, dry place, away from direct light.

Keep out of reach of children.

 

REFERENCES

Anonymous. Folic acid for the prevention of neural tube defects.

American Academy of Pediatrics. Committee on Genetics.

Pediatrics 1999;104:325-7.

Elkin AC, Higham J. Folic acid supplements are more effective

than increased dietary folate intake in elevating serum folate levels.

Bjog 2000;107:285-9.

Haller J. The vitamin status and its adequacy in the elderly: an

international overview. Int J Vitam Nutr Res 1999;69:160-8.

Jansonius JN. Structure, evolution and action of vitamin B6-

dependent enzymes. Curr Opin Struct Biol 1998;8:759-69.

Kim YI. Folate and cancer prevention: a new medical application

of folate beyond hyperhomocysteinemia and neural tube defects.

Nutr Rev 1999;57:314-21.

Kleijnen J, Knipschild P. Niacin and vitamin B6 in mental

functioning: a review of controlled trials in humans. Biol

Psychiatry 1991;29:931-41.

Lakshmi AV. Riboflavin metabolism–relevance to human

nutrition. Indian J Med Res 1998;108:182-90.

McCarty MF. High-dose pyridoxine as an ‘anti-stress’ strategy.

Med Hypotheses 2000;54:803-7.

Schoenthaler SJ, Bier ID. The effect of vitamin-mineral

supplementation on juvenile delinquency among American

schoolchildren: a randomized, double-blind placebo- controlled

trial [see comments]. J Altern Complement Med 2000;6:7-17.

Selhub J, Bagley LC, Miller J, et al. B vitamins, homocysteine, and

neurocognitive function in the elderly. Am J Clin Nutr

2000;71:614S-620S.

American Cancer Society. “Vitamin B Complex“. May 2010.

Chang TY, Chou KJ, Tseng CF, Chung HM, Fang HC, Hung YM, Wu MJ, Tzeng HM, Lind CC, Lu KC. “Effects of folic acid and vitamin B complex on serum C-reactive protein and albumin levels in stable hemodialysis patients.” Curr Med Res Opin. 2007 Aug;23(8):1879-86.

Clarke R, Lewington S, Sherliker P, Armitage J. “Effects of B-vitamins on plasma homocysteine concentrations and on risk of cardiovascular disease and dementia.” Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2007 Jan;10(1):32-9.

Galan P, Kesse-Guyot E, Czernichow S, Briancon S, Blacher J, Hercberg S; SU.FOL.OM3 Collaborative Group. “Effects of B vitamins and omega 3 fatty acids on cardiovascular diseases: a randomised placebo controlled trial.” BMJ. 2010 Nov 29;341:c6273. doi: 10.1136/bmj.c6273.

National Institutes of Health. “B Vitamins: Medline Plus“. August 2011.

National Institutes of Health. “Folic acid: MedlinePlus Supplements“. August 2011.

National Institutes of Health. “Niacin and niacinamide (Vitamin B3): MedlinePlus Supplements“. August 2011.

National Institutes of Health. “Pyridoxine (Vitamin B6): MedlinePlus Supplements“. August 2011.

National Institutes of Health. “Riboflavin (Vitamin B2): MedlinePlus Supplements“. August 2011.

National Institutes of Health. “Thiamine (Vitamin B1): MedlinePlus Supplements“. August 2011.

National Institutes of Health. “Vitamin B12: MedlinePlus Supplements“. August 2011.

http://altmedicine.about.com/

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.

This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Have a happy & healthy La Fheile Padraig!

St Patrick

 Happy St. Patricks day everyone!

Instead of giving in to tired old ‘Oirish’ stereotypes and consuming triple our body weight in alcohol in honour of St. Paddy, at Dunphy Medical we are increasing our consumption of chlorella, a green algae derived superfood packed with vitamins, minerals and protein. The name Chlorella is taken from the Greek chloros, meaning green, so it is the perfect accompaniment to St. Patricks Day celebrations! Chlorella is renowned for its detoxifying qualities making it even more suited for Paddy’s day consumption by many revellers around 17th March!

CP Protect

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“Chlorella, a single-celled fresh-water algae, is one of the most heavily researched algae in the world. It’s often referred to as a near-perfect food as research through the years have identified an astounding range of health benefits.  While being well known for its ability to detoxify your body by binding to toxins and carrying them out of your system, that’s certainly not all it’s good for.” (www.mercola.com)

Chlorella’s health benefits include:

Repairing nerve tissues Increasing your energy levels
Enhancing your immune system Normalizing your blood sugar
Improving digestion Normalizing your blood pressure
Promoting healthy pH levels in your gut, which in turn helps good bacteria to thrive Removing potentially toxic metals from your body
Enhancing your ability to focus and concentrate Eliminating bad breath

Chlorella can also be of benefit to vegetarians and vegans looking for proteins and B vitamins from a non-animal source. About 60 percent of it is protein, and because it contains all the essential amino acids your body needs, it’s considered to be a “complete protein.”

Chlorella is also rich in:

  • GABA
  • Folate
  • Vitamin B12
  • Iron

(www.mercola.com)

Mark Bittman: What’s wrong with what we eat, Ted Talk

In this fiery and funny talk, New York Times food writer Mark Bittman weighs in on what’s wrong with the way we eat now (too much meat, too few plants; too much fast food, too little home cooking), and why it’s putting the entire planet at risk.

Mark Bittman is a bestselling cookbook author, journalist and television personality. His friendly, informal approach to home cooking has shown millions that fancy execution is no substitute for flavor and soul.